Free Shipping on orders over $35 - Use code FREESHIP

Turn Left at Orion

Guy Consolmagno & Dan M. Davis
Item #81120

Hundreds of night sky objects to see in a home telescope - and how to find them.

Turn Left at Orion is a unique guidebook to the night sky, providing all the information you need to observe a whole host of celestial objects.

PRICE
$34.99
has been added to your cart.
An unexpected error has occurred and we are unable to process your request at this time.
Description

Turn Left at Orion is a unique guidebook to the night sky, providing all the information you need to observe a whole host of celestial objects. With spiral binding, this edition is easy to use outdoors at the telescope and is the ideal beginner's book. With its distinct one-object-per-spread format, this edition is designed for Dobsonian telescopes, as well as for smaller reflectors and refractors, and covers Southern hemisphere objects in more detail. Large-format eyepiece views, positioned side-by-side, show objects exactly as they are seen through a telescope, and with detailed directions, tables of astronomical information and an expansive night-by-night Moon section, it has never been easier to explore the night sky on your own.

Spiral Bound
Published by Cambridge University Press, December 2011

Author: Guy Consolmagno & Dan M. Davis
Size: 9.6 x 12.2
Pages: 256
Author Bio
Guy Consolmagno, Vatican Observatory, Vatican City
Guy Consolmagno is a Jesuit brother at the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory), dividing his time between Tucson, Arizona and Castel Gandolfo, Italy. He studies the origin and evolution of moons and asteroids in our solar system and uses a 3.5'' catadioptic and an 8'' Dobsonian. He has been awarded the 2014 Carl Sagan Medal from the American Astronomical Society for outstanding communication by an active planetary scientist to the general public.

Dan M. Davis, State University of New York, Stony Brook
Dan M. Davis is a professor of geophysics in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at Stony Brook University, New York. He researches the formation of mountain belts on Earth. His observations for this book were made with a 2.4" refractor and with 8" and 10" Dobsonians.
Table of Contents

How do you get to Albireo?
How to use this book
Using your telescope
Know your telescope
The Moon
The planets
Seasonal skies: January–March
Seasonal skies: April–June
Seasonal skies: July–September
Seasonal skies: October–December
Northern skies
Southern skies
Where do you go from here?
Beyond the eyepiece
Acknowledgments
Tables
Index
What, where, and when to observe
Finding geostationary satellites

Astronomy Discover